Tag Archives: microcap stocks

Eric NoveshenInfo Provides Research on Financial Consultant

Repeat; reiterate, as Noveshen does;

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This site is intended for the sole purpose of providing due diligence on investment advisor Eric Noveshen. To provide background and education to potential clients. All of the content comes from relevant PUBLIC SOURCES – gathered in one place so people can decide for themselves if they feel comfortable with this individual handling their money.

The NAICS classifies Eric Noveshen’s company Envision Capital LLCof Fort Lauderdale a provider of “Investment Advice.” When an “investment advisor,” brokerage firm, broker etc, is not registered with FINRA consumers have almost no collective source of information to decipher if it is safe to do business with the company. Investors of all income levels should have the right to relevant information about anyone managing their money or giving advice about the subject.
In this case, Noveshen was a registered broker up until 2003 or 04. According to its website, FINRA also provides the public with access to relevant information about formerly registered brokers who, although no longer in the securities industry in a registered capacity, may work in other investment-related industries or may seek to attain other positions of trust with potential investors. Through its BrokerCheck service.”
Noveshen has not been registered in over TEN years. While the information FINRA provides is extremely important and relevant for clients deciding to engage with Noveshen, the picture is incomplete. This website is intended to do no more than provide background information on Mr. Noveshen to individuals and companies who may be looking to do business with him.
Finra Broker Check
Finra Broker Check reveals sketchy Wall Street past

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FINRA Broker Check
FINRA Broker Check reveals sketchy Wall Street Past

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Man Jailed for Defrauding Michigan Investors in 2014 was Connected to Noveshen’s Penny Stock PNOW

Thanks to all from the press freedom convention who helped with our new encrypted drop. We are pleased that it has offered more identity protection to sources who wish to remain anonymous. Similar programs are used by internationally recognized press organizations who expose wrong doing in war zones, governments; legal systems; business operations and more.

Today we feature one product of the system that automatically encrypts identifying information.

According to our source, and fact checking, many at micro cap stock Pure Hospitality Solutions, PNOW, claimed the company was not connected to Pat Hundley who was jailed in 2014 in Costa Rica for allegedly defrauding close to $7-million from Michigan investors. PNOW was formerly called  OTHM before it changed its symbol in Fall 2014. Eric Noveshen is a consultant to the stock though he claims for purposes of a lawsuit against this website not to be. Much like OTHM claimed to have no affiliation with Patrick Hundley after his arrest.

PNOW reportedly ran between five to eleven pump and dump stock scam cycles in the last decade.

Ken Chua, the Chairman and CEO at the Time of signing this document, was sanctioned by the British Colombia Securities Commission in August 2014 and later resigned his position to Melvin Pereira, who remains the CEO today.  The BCSC commission found that Ken Chua “continues to pose a risk to our investors and our markets.”

This document proves a connection between Hundley, Pereira and Chua.

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Man Accused of Fraud Against Michigan Investors

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Is Noveshen Still Denying Involvement with Pump & Dump Stock Scams?

Is Eric Noveshen still denying that he has ever been involved with microcap stock fraud? -Noveshen keeps insisting he was never involved in a pump-and-dump stock scam. Did he forget about Itronics? It was a long time ago but he can’t even remember that he’s involved with Pure Hospitality Solutions, as of, when was the last deposit he got from selling shares of PNOW? Likely within the last couple months. Investors pay consultants of penny stocks, get no return and are forgotten – quickly. Don’t be a victim.

Microcap Stock Fraud Noveshen

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Blog Serves Public Interest of Investors And Promotes Noveshen is Willing to ‘Play Ball’

Eric Noveshen has a knack for the poor me story (as stated by his grandmother in a letter the last blog).

Now he’s asking the court to shut down this blog claiming that he can’t get work. Anyone who knows what kind of work Noveshen does can see this blog is the best advertisement for hire Noveshen’s ever had.

You can’t go on a LinkedIn resume and write “I’m down to play dirty ball in microcap stock fraud.”

This blog does that for him in shining colors. So the false loss of work story is not why Noveshen wants this down. This blog helps him get work.

Noveshen wants this blog down because while those companies want guys who will play dirty, but Noveshen doesn’t want to show them he’s on the radar of the SEC, FINRA and the Department of Justice. And don’t forget the many financial investigative reporters lurking in the background just waiting to break their next story.

To remove this blog would be an injustice to the Public, to anyone considering entering the microcap stock market. According to Investopedia, “Penny stocks aren’t a lost cause, but they are very high-risk investments that aren’t suitable for all investors. If you can’t resist the lure of micro caps, make sure you do extensive research and understand what you are getting into.”

The full article explains why extensive research is often hard to come by, the promoters and consultants make it that way on purpose. They don’t want you to know that $5000 suit you are about to buy online is stained before you click order.

The Lowdown On Penny Stocks” | Investopedia http://www.investopedia.com/articles/03/050803.asp#ixzz4CgSAN9lW

Yes we also cover Noveshen’s grotesque abuse of the Broward County and Florida court systems and his willingness to steal money from his own family because that’s called transparency folks. If you’re going to invest your money in a penny stock you should have the right to know if one of its main consultants will take from his own family then he’ll probably take from you. The public should have the right to this knowledge.

Penny stocks are a fools game.

“You’re betting against the house – and the house always wins,” according to reporter John Divine, in 5 Reasons to Avoid Penny Stocks at all Costs. “Everyone remembers the grandma who won the $10 million jackpot playing the slot machine.

“5 Reasons to Avoid Penny Stocks at All Costs”

http://money.usnews.com/investing/articles/2016-03-29/5-reasons-to-avoid-penny-stocks-at-all-costs

“But no one recalls the 100,000 players who lost $100 apiece to pay her out. No news articles are written about the next 100,000 gamblers who flushed their hard-earned savings into the casino’s bottom line.

To take this information down would be a disservice to the public interest. AND THERE WILL BE MORE PENNY STOCK INVESTORS VICTIM and victims to other financial scams orchestrated and calculated by Eric Noveshen and his crew.

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US Attorney General: Why did Eric Noveshen Walk Away but Daryl Dworkin Had to Pay?

US Attorney General, how much more securities fraud are you going to let Eric Noveshen get away with?

Why did Daryl Dworkin have to pay back the $375,000 kick back money and fines but Noveshen didn’t have to pay a dime of restitution?

Why are two men guilty of the same securities crimes but only one is sentenced and fined?

Why was Eric Noveshen’s cut of the Medgen money laundered “consulting fees” left for him to enjoy? Did he even pay taxes on that money? Probably not, he’s allowed to commit tax evasion too? Noveshen has some serious power with the SEC and IRS, not even an hand slap.

Does the SEC and Dept. of Justice know or care how many investors have been hurt in six years since they let Eric Noveshen walk away from his criminal acts? Check with investors in these microcap stocks ….EDWY, SMEV, SLGS, PNOW (formerly OTHM), HIMR, GAHC, BMIN and more. 

Transcript from United States of America v. Daryl Dworkin 

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Transfer Agent Investigated by SEC Connected to a Noveshen Pump-and-Dump Scam

On May 25, 2016 a cease and desist was issued by the SEC against transfer agent American Registrar & Transfer Company.

This is the same transfer agent the consulting team led by Ajene Watson consisting of Eric Noveshen insisted that microcap company Simulated Enviornment Concepts, INC (SMEV)  use as a TA so that defendants, including Noveshen, could “control and influence” the transfer agent during their manipulation of SMEV’s stock price.

Click to access 33-10082.pdf

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Connection to SMEV Stock and a list of some companies American Registrar & Transfer Co. associated with from http://www.otcmarkets.com

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Below are parts of the complaint detailing the pump and dump scheme allegedly lead by Ajene Watson, and the entire complaint is here:

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SMEV Compaint Cover

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The SEC defines the important role of transfer agents in preventing microcap fraud scams below:

Revisiting the Role and Regulation of Transfer Agents

https://www.sec.gov/News/Speech/Detail/Speech/1370540828740

“Obviously, when trillions of dollars are involved, it is important that transfer agents fulfill their responsibilities with accuracy and professionalism.  And, fortunately, that is usually the case.

Another critical responsibility of transfer agents is to keep track of the restrictive legends and “stop transfer” orders that distinguish restricted securities and control shares from freely-tradable securities.  As such, transfer agents are often in a position to prevent unregistered securities from being distributed in violation of the Securities Act.  This gatekeeper role takes on particular importance with microcap securities because typically there is little, if any, meaningful disclosure or independent research regarding such companies.  The potential for fraud and abuse in the microcap markets is well-known.[27]  Indeed, violations of the registration provisions are often associated with microcap pump-and-dump schemes and other penny stock fraud.

In fact, the Commission has brought numerous cases against transfer agents who violate federal securities law in connection with fraudulent pump-and-dump schemes.[28]  You can expect the Commission to bring more cases since, as many of you know, the Division of Enforcement has created a Microcap Fraud Task Force that will, among other things, target gatekeepers such as transfer agents, attorneys, and auditors who participate in pump-and-dump schemes and penny stock fraud.[29]

Unfortunately, in addition to those transfer agents that are active participants in fraud, there are also those transfer agents that have been duped into removing restrictive legends from stock certificates; as a result, unregistered securities have been illegally sold in the public markets.  Frequently, this occurs on the basis of fraudulent attorney opinion letters[30]  Often, however, transfer agents have acted in the face of numerous red-flags warning of an illegal stock offering.[31]  This occurs with enough regularity that I believe the Commission should clarify the steps that could be taken by transfer agents and other gatekeepers to prevent violations in the microcap space.[32]

Memorial Day Reminder -Recognize Red Flags of Stock Scams

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On this day we salute those who gave all. A message to those who “take all”stock fraud is very unpatriotic.

Defrauding fellow Americans and other investors around the world might make you nice living, but ever think about the livings of those you are scamming? Maybe its a war hero? Did he or she lose a limb? Did he or she just get back from duty in Afghanistan while you sat behind a computer posting fake hype to get him to invest in a shell you stuffed a fake company in? Maybe that $5,000 invested in your penny stock means nothing to you but is half of someones retirement?

Note to investors: perpetrators of stock fraud do not care. REPORTERS, the SEC, FINRA, POLITICIANS and the COURTS can’t catch all the microcap stock fraud so educate yourselves before investing.

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https://www.investor.gov/investing-basics/avoiding-fraud/types-fraud/microcap-fraud

The Seedy World of Microcap Stock Advisors

https://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/investor_protection_guide_micro-cap_stock_fraud_pump_and_dump

 

Why Reporting On Stock Manipulation Is Important

Investors Beware! Microcap stocks are risky, ‘the odds are stacked against you.’

Stock fraud has devastating effects on victims and thus, reporting on stock fraud is extremely important.

On January 29, 2010, the FBI published a story about a ten year investigation into pump-and-dump stocks scams. The investigation uncovered more than 40 schemes, convicted 40 perpetrators, identified thousands of victims in nearly every state and discovered hundreds of millions of dollars in losses.

That pump-and-dumps target elderly investors is no secret. That the FBI can’t keep up with the pace of pump-and-dump scams is no secret, they sprout like “mushrooms.” That perpetrators of stock fraud don’t want coverage of their actions is common sense. If information is easy to obtain in a simple google search, less people will fall victim.

https://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/2010/january/fraud_012910

From the FBI story:

How do these scams work? In this case, the ringleaders created shell companies whose penny stock (worth less than $5 a share) was traded on the OTC Bulletin Board (not on the more widely known New York Stock Exchange or NASDAQ). They secretly issued most of the shares for themselves in fictitious names, then touted their companies’ stock through false statements in press releases, electronic bulletin board postings, online newsletters, and the like.

Often using their retirement funds, unsuspecting investors purchased the highly-touted stock—or their unscrupulous financial advisors did so without their knowledge—driving or “pumping” up the price. Then, the fraudsters “dumped,” or sold, their stock for thousands or millions of dollars, causing the stock to plummet and innocent investors to lose their shirts.”

In many cases, the losses were significant. And while running an undercover operation and gathering enough evidence to put the criminals behind bars, our focus has been on helping victims get some of their hard-earned money back. We spent years interviewing more than 600 mainly elderly victims, painstakingly documenting their sometimes heartbreaking losses. For example:

  • We assisted a doctor from a prestigious hospital who began suffering from severe depression after learning of the scam and became unable to work. To help a husband and wife who had both developed dementia during the investigation, our agents traveled to their nursing home and spent hours with them, their family members, and their accountants to substantiate their financial losses.
  • We worked with a man suffering from multiple sclerosis whose stockbroker had liquidated his pension and IRA and left him nearly penniless.
  • We learned of another victim who not only invested her savings and her pension, but also took out a second mortgage to invest more. Needless to say, she lost everything.

An investment blog on Reddit offered a behind the scenes look at the inner workings of one particular IR (investor relations) company – that was a pump-and-dump shop. “Stock Jockey” states, “The “odds are stacked against you right from the beginning. In your efforts to do some research on a penny stock, you may find yourself reading some forums and thinking you are getting unbiased opinions. You are not!

IR companies often handle investor relations for a large number of small cap stocks. People usually don’t get to see what really goes on. In the back office of one particular IR company there was a large space dedicated to about ten desks that had a computer and 2 screens on each desk. There were ten young guys all tapping away on their keyboards.

Strolling over to the desks, it became apparent that these guys were on various stock forums, chatting away with each other!

it seemed that, each screen could have four browser windows, each browser window could potentially be a different alias on some chat board.

With ten of them in that room, they could easily be creating the illusion that some stock was getting a lot of chatter and excitement on some chat boards!

This is part of what IR firms do for companies. They charge tens of thousands of dollars per month for these kind of services.

If you are ever looking at some penny stock and you see 5,10 or 20 people all chatting up that stock, it is likely that those aliases are simply some promotion firm at work!

It is their job to create excitement and generate hype, it is all they do all day, every day.

I have even seen a tactic where one or two guys will pretend to be bearish on a stock and go on the attack, only to be “convinced” later on that the stock is actually very good and will rally soon. The tricks are endless and these guys pros and manipulating emotions

Be ever weary!  These IR firms were often paid in tradable stock! I think there are regulations these days which have banned this practice, but there are loopholes to it.

Basically this meant that if you were the CEO of penny stock WXYZ and you wanted to hire this IR firm, you would not write them a cheque for $50,000/month, you sent them a bag full of your shares! If you stock was trading at 10c, this firm would get 500,000 free trading shares. This is a win/win for the penny stock and the IR firm (assuming they do their job).

For the penny stock it means you do not have to lay out any cash, you simply hand out stock which costs you nothing (penny stocks are notorious for increasing the authorized shares, ie dilution). For the IR firm it means that they can potentially make a lot more money than if they were simply paid in cash. Having 500,000 shares @10c means that if they could pump the stock up to 20c, they have basically made $50,000 more! This is why they would game the message boards and farm out the promotional activities to other promoters, to try maximize their gains.

Here again we have another potential reason why a stock can suddenly fall for no reason at all. If this IR firm’s CEO decided he wanted to buy a new Porsche this weekend, he could simply pick a random clients stock that he was no longer working for and dump all the shares he had in it. He does not care about the potential of the company and where the stock was going in six months from now, he simply wants to cash out.

Stock buyer beware, ask a lot of questions and read the fine print!

 

 

 

Microcap companies – SEC Says Check Out People Running The Company

The SEC, in a page designed to help those interested in investing in Microcap stocks advises people to check out the people running the company. What happens when that information is concealed? Investors often feel the rub.

Microcap companies – What’s So Important About Public Information?

In the microcap world, consultants or people who lend money to micro companies who then can’t pay the debts back then have to pay in large blocks of stock, which they usually sell off fast and drive the price of the stock to nothing. Often, the same consultants and lenders go from company to company repeating the same frauds. Investors have a right to know the history of an individual in control of their money. If an individual has any ties to past scam companies, this information is either totally concealed or hard to find.

“Of potentially greater concern is that the lack of reliable, readily available information about some microcap companies can open the door to fraud. It’s easier for fraudsters to manipulate a stock when there’s little or no information available about the company.”

“Publicly-available information about microcap stocks, including penny stocks  often is scarce.  This makes it easier for fraudsters to spread false information.  In addition, it is often easier for fraudsters to manipulate the price of microcap stocks because microcap stocks historically have been less liquid than the stock of larger companies.”

Before investing in a microcap, the SEC advises:

  1. Read carefully the most recent reports the company has filed with the SEC and pay attention to the company’s financial statements, particularly if they are not audited or not certified by an accountant.
  2. Check out the people running the company with your state securities regulator, and find out if they’ve ever made money for investors before. Also ask whether the people running the company have had run-ins with the regulators or other investors.

Who pulling the strings inside a company is a significant information that investors in all types of publicly traded companies should have the right to.  But often if you read the fine print of a financial report you will find a statement like these: (pulled from real reports)

“On September 4, 2015, the Company entered into a consulting agreement, effective October 1, 2015, for an initial term of three months”

“the Company entered into consulting agreements with four sons of its President, for their respective consulting services at a rate of $29,000, respectively.”

With Who? Or the consulting agreement will be with a company, you have no idea who the actual people are you’re giving your money to. If you look up the company it can be some ambiguous company registered to another company.

Information is investors best weapon against fraud. Fraudsters don’t want their information public.

This is why we support reporters like Teri Buhl, be thank ful for her trademark “Smashmouth Investigative Journalism” probing and asking the questions and reporting stories fraudsters don’t want told. She dug deep into the NIR debocal that caused investors to lose millions that the government could never recover. All this is relevant to this site because of NIRs storied PIPE deal finder Eric Noveshen – knowing the players is important when thousands of people have their money on the line.http://www.teribuhl.com/2011/11/23/pwc-says-nir-group-doesnt-have-access-to-dealer-market/

Some of the comments posted on her reports:

I have lost a huge portion of my retirement in the NIR fund, AJW Offshore. Corey Ribotsky seems to be doing well and I need to contact him regarding my losses. I need Corey’s phone or email address. Help!

December 9, 2011 at 1:06 pm
Can you please look into the NIR payment arrangement with the Itronics settlement.
I think you’ll be startled at what you uncover. In a nutshell, Itronics has been committing fraud on multiple levels. They agreed to settle with NIR for $8M+ payable in shares or cash. The company has zero cash yet they only added about $600k worth of shares to their outstanding share count since the May 4, 2011 payout commencement date. This means NIR is being paid in something other than just shares. It’s widely speculated that ITRO is grossly understating revenues and selling silver off the books to pay this settlement or some other nefarious scheme. Perhaps they have a deal with silver? Nobody knows for sure but I’d bet my bottom dollar that NIR is receiving dirty money from ITRO and may very well be complicit in the scheme.

Itronics the good ole fertilizer company, Eric Noveshen had his hand in that cookie jar. Last year he claimed he wasn’t connected to NIR, for good reason, but don’t investors have the right to know? https://www.sec.gov/litigation/litreleases/2011/lr22106.htm

From a 2009 deposition of Corey Ribotsky:

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Curt Kramer? Connect the dots again…Noveshen worked with Kramer in a pump and dump of a Florida based company, SMEV that resulted in a federal lawsuit in 2012, Allen Licht v. Ajene Watson et. al (Noveshen was a defendant). Bet Allen Licht wish he knew this information prior to signing a deal with him.

Curt Kramer was blacklisted by FINRA in 2013.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/sec-ups-efforts-to-combat-manipulations-of-microcap-stocks/2013/11/28/588b1af2-576e-11e3-8304-caf30787c0a9_story.html

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EDWY, edoorways – another pump and dump Noveshen benefited from in 2009-10, as noted in Allen Licht v. Ajene Watson et. al.  Warning: the circle isn’t too big folks. 

http://investorshub.advfn.com/boards/read_msg.aspx?message_id=103620719

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